Fashion News

Greta Thunberg uses Vogue interview to slam the impact of fast fashion

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg is the new cover of the first issue of Vogue Scandinavia, a photoshoot doing the rounds on social media.

When most celebrities appear on the cover of a magazine, they post the photos online and give a shoutout to their makeup artist and photographer and talk about how excited they were.

But when the 18-year-old teenage climate campaigner, best known for her hoodie jackets, woollen gloves and purple anorak, posted the cover on her Instagram on Sunday, she took the opportunity to criticise the fast-moving fashion industry.

“The fashion industry is a huge contributor to the climate and ecological emergency,” Greta said on the social platform. “Even more so at the expense of countless workers and communities who are being exploited around the world in order for some to enjoy fast fashion that many treat as disposables.”

She says she never buys new clothes, but if she does, they are second hand.

“The last time I bought something new was three years ago and it was second-hand. I just borrow things from people I know,” Thunberg said.

Vogue Scandinavia accepted the scolding, claiming they shared Thunberg’s values on sustainable living and environmental protection.

On the cover, the clothes Sweden’s most famous activist wears were made of sustainable, recycled material.

Greta wears an oversized multi-layered trench coat, sitting by a horse, picturing a slightly different fashion icon in a fairy tale forest.

Calls for a change in how clothing is produced and consumed worldwide

The Swedish activist slammed the fashion industry for their ‘green’ fashion campaigns.

“Many are making it look as if the fashion industry is starting to take responsibility, by spending fantasy amounts on campaigns where they portray themselves as ‘sustainable,’ ‘ethical,’ ‘green,’ ‘climate neutral’ and ‘fair.’

“But let’s be clear: This is almost never anything but pure greenwashing. You cannot mass produce fashion or consume ‘sustainably’ as the world is shaped today. That is one of the many reasons why we will need a system change,” she added.

Watch the full video report in the player above.