May 10, 2021

Disease

Heart disease and stroke risk doubles if your husband or wife has it, study finds

Having a husband or wife with a heart problem could double someone’s own risk of suffering a stroke or heart attack, according to a study.

Chinese researchers found couples’ heart health was clearly linked and a worsening in one partner was likely to trigger the same in their spouse.

Living the same unhealthy lifestyles was the main link between the two, it suggested — but the stress of looking after a seriously ill partner could also raise heart risk.

One in four men whose wives had heart disease also had the illness themselves, compared to one in eight with healthy

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Heart disease in women: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment

Heart disease may cause pain in the chest, neck, jaw, or back. However, heart disease in females can cause different symptoms. Females are more likely to experience “atypical” symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, tiredness, or no symptoms at all.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that heart disease is the leading cause of death for females in the United States. However, only 56% are aware of the risk.

This article looks at the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of heart disease in females. It also looks at disparities in treatment between males and females, and how to lower

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Women’s heart disease symptoms different than those in men

LUMBERTON — Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both women and men.

Learning to recognize symptoms early is of great importance, but it may be challenging for women because their symptoms are different than those in men.

The classical presentation of a heart attack is central chest discomfort lasting a few minutes intermittently. Patients of both genders usually describe crushing, squeezing pain or fullness sensation. However, for women, chest pain may not be as intense or it may not be the most bothersome symptom. Frequently, women complain of pain down the arms, jaw,

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How Heart Disease Differs for Women


This is just one of several recent findings — with more included below — that shed light on sex-related differences in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease.

Younger women are at greater risk of death

Women have fewer heart attacks than men, but they tend to fare worse during them. To find out why, researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, examined hospital data on nearly 7 million heart attack patients. In a study published in January in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, they showed that women who are hospitalized with a heart attack are less likely than men to

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