May 13, 2021

Heart

5 ways to get to the heart of women’s health

As part of National Women’s Health Week, experts at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation are getting to the heart of the matter: cardiovascular disease.

It’s the leading cause of death for women in the Sooner state. But prevention isn’t out of reach, and small changes can add up to longer, healthier life.

Vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins are the tried-and-true Mediterranean diet.

1. Food for thought

“Your gift to your heart is a moderate diet of vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins. It’s the tried-and-true Mediterranean diet,” said OMRF Vice President of Research Rodger McEver, M.D., a cardiovascular biologist.

The fare results in lower cholesterol, blood pressure and blood glucose

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Heart disease and stroke risk doubles if your husband or wife has it, study finds

Having a husband or wife with a heart problem could double someone’s own risk of suffering a stroke or heart attack, according to a study.

Chinese researchers found couples’ heart health was clearly linked and a worsening in one partner was likely to trigger the same in their spouse.

Living the same unhealthy lifestyles was the main link between the two, it suggested — but the stress of looking after a seriously ill partner could also raise heart risk.

One in four men whose wives had heart disease also had the illness themselves, compared to one in eight with healthy

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Heart disease in women: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment

Heart disease may cause pain in the chest, neck, jaw, or back. However, heart disease in females can cause different symptoms. Females are more likely to experience “atypical” symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, tiredness, or no symptoms at all.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that heart disease is the leading cause of death for females in the United States. However, only 56% are aware of the risk.

This article looks at the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of heart disease in females. It also looks at disparities in treatment between males and females, and how to lower

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Women’s heart disease symptoms different than those in men

LUMBERTON — Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both women and men.

Learning to recognize symptoms early is of great importance, but it may be challenging for women because their symptoms are different than those in men.

The classical presentation of a heart attack is central chest discomfort lasting a few minutes intermittently. Patients of both genders usually describe crushing, squeezing pain or fullness sensation. However, for women, chest pain may not be as intense or it may not be the most bothersome symptom. Frequently, women complain of pain down the arms, jaw,

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How heart attack symptoms differ in men and women

GREENVILLE, S.C. (WSPA) – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the U.S., but only half of women recognize it as their top killer.

Bon Secours S. Francis Registered Nurse Meredith Thackston said many of her patients know heart attack symptoms that are typically seen in men, but that women often have very different symptoms and many don’t know what they are.

“Your classic symptoms are ‘there’s an elephant sitting on my chest and I can’t breathe,” she said. “Some people just have back

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LIVE HEALTHY HARTSVILLE: A woman’s heart | Lifestyles

When we look at all the things that you do have control over, it should be noted that how you eat plays a major role in how well you can control several of these factors. The first thing I recommend to help your heart out is eat more vegetables.

If you focus on the foods that you can benefit from and work on adding them into your daily eating plan, you will start to weed out those items that you do not need as much of anyway. So, start with vegetables, especially the non-starchy kind, like greens, peppers, squash, tomatoes

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How Heart Disease Differs for Women


This is just one of several recent findings — with more included below — that shed light on sex-related differences in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease.

Younger women are at greater risk of death

Women have fewer heart attacks than men, but they tend to fare worse during them. To find out why, researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, examined hospital data on nearly 7 million heart attack patients. In a study published in January in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, they showed that women who are hospitalized with a heart attack are less likely than men to

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Go Red for Women Day kicks off American Heart Month

Feb. 5th is the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Day, which kicks off the start of American Heart Month. The goals are to raise awareness and save lives

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich — The color red symbolizes love, life and for the month of February, it represents heart health.

Friday, February 5th is the American Heart Association’s annual “Go Red For Women Day.” Launched in 2004, it is the AHA’s signature women’s initiative and the official kick off of American Heart Month.

“We are hoping that we will get women’s attention,” says Kellie Norton, with regional director with Blue

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