March 3, 2021

men

Women potters of North Georgia step out of the long shadow cast by men

The Folk Pottery Museum of Northeast Georgia in Sautee celebrates these late-blooming artisans with an exhibit called “The Men Won’t Tell Us Anything” that runs through July. It features the handiwork of Davies along with 11 female potters born between 1890 and 1940.

“These are the older generation,” says museum director Anna-Louise Calliham, noting that about half of them are deceased, and the others are octogenarians. “Next January we plan to feature women potters born from 1950 on.”

Mildred Meaders' "Devil Politician" face jug.
Courtesy of William M. House

Mildred Meaders’ “Devil Politician” face jug.
Courtesy of William M. House

Credit: William M. House

Credit: William M. House

Among the potters

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Women’s heart disease symptoms different than those in men

LUMBERTON — Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both women and men.

Learning to recognize symptoms early is of great importance, but it may be challenging for women because their symptoms are different than those in men.

The classical presentation of a heart attack is central chest discomfort lasting a few minutes intermittently. Patients of both genders usually describe crushing, squeezing pain or fullness sensation. However, for women, chest pain may not be as intense or it may not be the most bothersome symptom. Frequently, women complain of pain down the arms, jaw,

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How heart attack symptoms differ in men and women

GREENVILLE, S.C. (WSPA) – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the U.S., but only half of women recognize it as their top killer.

Bon Secours S. Francis Registered Nurse Meredith Thackston said many of her patients know heart attack symptoms that are typically seen in men, but that women often have very different symptoms and many don’t know what they are.

“Your classic symptoms are ‘there’s an elephant sitting on my chest and I can’t breathe,” she said. “Some people just have back

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Women now outnumber men in med school. And studies show that’s good for patients.

When Dr. Angela Nunnery started her career, she was the only African-American woman physician on staff at Kingwood Medical Center, now known as HCA Houston Healthcare Kingwood.

She was also the only African-American woman practicing medicine in Kingwood. But that was 30 years ago, and the present and future for women physicians in the U.S. is bright, Nunnery said.

“When you look at my medical school graduating class picture in 1985 and then what it looks like now — it’s amazing, outstanding,

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